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Burr's Web site flaw cleared up

U.S. Sen. Richard Burr's team works fast.

Earlier this afternoon, Dome briefly mentioned that the design of the Winston-Salem Republican's "Constituent Services" page on his Web site was flawed.

A large blank spot on the page made it look like nothing was on the page, even though Burr had several links for such things as requesting a flag or learning about internships.

(To be clear: This is nothing like the spelling snafu that slammed Pat McCrory. The links were there, but the page was hard to navigate.) 

In typical Washington fashion, the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee pounced on the rather minor flaw even as Burr's team quickly fixed the problem.

"Based on the number of tour and flag requests the office has received, as well as requests for assistance with federal grants and a surge in applications for summer internships, North Carolinians appear to have had little trouble navigating the Constituent Services sections of the website," said spokesman Chris Walker in an e-mail.

He said they fixed the glitch to help Dome and others better navigate the site in the future. 


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Re: Burr's Web site flaw cleared up

I'm so glad Burr got right on that just 5 years into his term. Constituent Services are important at re-election time.

I just happened to notice the other day that many of the dead end links in Burr's official government website are still cached in Google to this day.

Try Googling "Contact Richard Burr."

Richard Burr, United States Senator of North Carolina: Home
Contact Me. Home. Home Page | About Senator Burr | Constituent Services | Issues & Legislation | Press Office · For Students & Kids | Privacy Policy | Site ... burr.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=Contact.Home - 10k -

The Richard Burr "Contact Me" homepage is a real hoot.

Re: Burr's Web site flaw cleared up

The following is from Senator Kay Hagan's website during the campaign...

"Reinstate fiscal responsibility: Federal budget deficits can have a significant impact on the household budgets of all Americans. The Federal Reserve has concluded that increased federal budget deficits cause interest rates to rise. In fact, the Federal Reserve states that for every additional one percent increase in the federal deficit as a share of the gross domestic product (GDP), interest rates will rise one-quarter of one
percent. Under the Bush Administration, the federal deficit has climbed by four percentage points as a share of the GDP, meaning that interest rates are, on average, a full point higher. One group has calculated that this one percent increase in interest rates for home, car, student, and credit card debt can cost consumers $1,752 per year. Moreover, every North Carolina family pays an average of $1,867 in taxes each year just to pay the interest on the $9.6 trillion national debt. To reduce our ballooning budget deficit, Kay will slash wasteful spending, demand that Congress follow pay-as-you-go rules, and close tax loopholes for big, multinational corporations. We must also fight against wasteful federal contracts and explore ways to reduce our national debt, specifically our foreign-held debt. Restoring discipline to our fiscal policy will enable our monetary policymakers to lower interest rates, which, in turn, will reduce everyday costs for middle class Americans."

Yet she voted for the $410 billion Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 and has touted garnering over $520 million dollars for North Carolina.

Ryan - this is a story of how she has already flip flopped on her stances...this is a real story....

Re: Burr's Web site flaw cleared up

Wow must be a slow news day...

At least Burr's office is responsive compared to Senator Hagan's office.

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