newsobserver.com blogs

Tag search result

Tip: Clicking on tags in this page allows you to drill further with combined tag search. For example, if you are currently viewing the tag search result page for "health care", clicking on "Kay Hagan" will bring you to a list of contents that are tagged with both "health care" and "Kay Hagan."

Morning Memo: Vice President Biden to raise money for Kay Hagan

VICE PRESIDENT TO HEADLINE HAGAN FUNDRAISER: Vice President Joe Biden will visit North Carolina on Oct. 21 to help Democratic U.S. Sen. Kay Hagan raise campaign cash for her re-election bid in 2014. Biden will speak at a luncheon at the Washington Duke Inn in Durham, according to a copy of the invitation obtained by Dome.

The top ticket costs $10,000 and includes a photo and special host reception. The lowest priced ticket is $500 for the reception. The money will go to Hagan’s joint fundraising committee with the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, which has higher donation limits.

A day earlier, Hagan will hold another fundraiser in Durham at the Deer Chase Gardens hosted by Marcia Angle and Mark Trustin, the property’s owners. The more than two-dozen hosts for the reception are paying $1,000 each. The top ticket is the maximum federal contribution to a candidate, $2,600. The host list includes big local Democratic donors, such as John Replogle, John Sall and Amy Tiemann. The minimum ticket costs $150.

***Read more about the 2014 Senate race and more below in the Dome Morning Memo.***

Morning Memo: Let the shutdown politics begin

THEN SHUT IT DOWN: The U.S. government started shutting down early Tuesday after a bitter fight over the new health care law deadlocked the Congress and stymied every attempt to keep money flowing after the federal fiscal year ended at midnight. It was the first such collapse of the government in nearly two decades and there was no immediate way to know how long it would last or how it would end. Read more here.

NOW BLAME GAME BEGINS: Hours after the partial shutdown, the blame game started, with Democrats and Republicans trying to say the other party was responsible. North Carolina congressmen are in the crosshairs.

***Read more shutdown politics and a look at what Gov. Pat McCrory did as the impasse and a federal lawsuit against the state loomed -- it's all below in the Dome Morning Memo.***

Richard Hudson comes out against striking Syria

Rep. Richard Hudson, a Republican from Concord, said Friday he will oppose U.S. military action in Syria.

"I have taken the last several days to study the situation in Syria, receiving intelligence briefings and speaking with my colleagues in Congress,'' Hudson said in a statement. "It has become clear to me that President Obama and his Administration do not have a cohesive long-term policy for the Middle East and are unable to articulate a strategy in Syria. The Administration has also not made it clear what objective and end game is achievable with a limited use of force. To make matters worse, it appears that if we were to pursue the President’s suggested course of military action, we would be acting unilaterally, as support from our allies is nearly nonexistent. Limited unilateral action will not send the right message to Iran and other bad actors, and I fear it will only further destabilize the region.''

“Up to this point, President Obama and his Administration have not done a credible job in demonstrating strength of conviction in the region and sending cruise missiles into Damascus now isn’t going to change that,'' Hudson said. "I do not believe it is in our best interest to take the military action currently proposed by the President against Syria."

Morning Memo: McCrory gets campaign cash from indicted donor, Hudson on the rise

GOP GOV REPORTS CAMPAIGN CASH WELL AFTER ELECTION DAY: Pat McCrory won the governor's race Nov. 6 but campaign donors kept filling his coffers through the end of the year, according to new campaign finance reports. The Republican reported raising more than $42,000 after Election Day putting his total haul for the entire campaign at $12.3 million -- nearly three times as much as Democratic rival Walter Dalton, who raised $4.3 million.

McCRORY REPORTS DONATION FROM INDICTED DONOR:One more donation listed after the election: Trawick "Buzzy" Stubbs. He gave McCrory $1,000 in a check reported Nov. 27.

Stubbs was indicted in 2012 for his political donations to Gov. Bev Perdue in the 2008 race involving a plane he allowed the Democrat to use in the campaign. He is charged with obstruction of justice and causing the campaign to file false reports. After his indictment, Republican Lt. Gov. Dan Forest, then just a candidate, returned the $250 donation Stubbs gave his campaign. The case is still pending and Stubbs is challenging the charges.

This is the Dome Morning Memo, a political tipsheet covering North Carolina politics. Read more campaign finance exclusive and a news roundup below.

Kissell welcomes Hudson to Washington

U.S. Rep. Larry Kissell welcomed Congressman-elect Richard Hudson to his Washington office on Thursday.

The two met to discuss issues important to North Carolina’s 8th District, and to update Hudson on the ongoing work of Kissell’s office.Hudson, a Republican, ousted two-term Democrat Kissell to take over the seat after a campaign that was expensive and hotly-contested.

Morning Roundup: Ellmers gets the benefit of a newly drawn district

Democrat Steve Wilkins, running in a tough congressional race against Republican Rep. Renee Ellmers, says his 22 years of military service – which include a key role in planning the invasion of Iraq – show the spirit of public service Washington needs to break the partisan logjam.

Wilkins is at the polls every day, introducing himself to early voters. But the odds are against him. National Democrats haven’t poured money into his campaign. And Ellmers, with much more cash, has another big advantage: The Republican legislature redrew her district in her favor. Full race profile here.

More political headlines:

--The main candidates for governor say they favor taking some steps to make state government more transparent, but both avoid sweeping promises about opening up many more records than are already public.

Morning Roundup: Goldman-Malone entanglement may impact election

Fallout from the entanglement of Wake County school board members Debra Goldman and Chris Malone will likely affect both this fall’s elections and the work of the panel, analysts and public figures said Sunday.

Malone said he and Goldman had a “very heated” physical relationship. Goldman said she rebuffed his romantic advances. Andy Taylor, an N.C. State University political expert, said it will hurt both Goldman’s and Malone’s campaigns, but especially Goldman’s. “The auditor is supposed to be keeping people in government honest, trying to protect the public’s interests and promoting transparency,” Taylor said. Read more here and another story about the repeated police calls to Goldman's home.

More political headlines:

--Middle class couples like Sarah and Stephen Geis of Charlotte see the presidential election's impact on children.

Morning Roundup: Congressman Kissell refuses to debate GOP rival Hudson

Citing scheduling conflicts, U.S. Rep. Larry Kissell, D-N.C., has declined to commit to a locally televised debate with Republican challenger Richard Hudson.

Hudson, in a statement released by his campaign, called on the Democratic congressman “to come out of hiding.” Full story here.

More political headlines:

--Get a rundown on the feisty second presidential debate and see a fact check on the candidates' statements. Students at Queens College gave the win to the president.

--Emulating President Barack Obama, Walter Dalton also took an aggressive stance while Pat McCrory bobbed and weaved in the governor's race debate. And see an excerpt from a key exchange.

Morning Roundup: Kissell, Hudson spar about Medicare in AARP debate

In the latest faceoff for one of the most competitive congressional seats in the country, the 8th District candidates sparred Monday over Medicare, Social Security and other issues crucial to senior citizens.

Democratic U.S. Rep. Larry Kissell said he opposes any changes to those two programs, while Republican Richard Hudson said he’d favor offering retirement “choices” to those now his age (40) and younger. Full debate story here.

More political headlines here:

--South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley had a simple message Monday for undecided North Carolina women: Jobs and the economy should trump social issues when it comes to deciding the next president.

Morning Roundup: Gary Johnson makes his case for president

A quick glance at Gary Johnson during his visit Thursday to Duke University was enough to realize the Libertarian candidate for president is no Barack Obama or Mitt Romney.

The former two-term governor of New Mexico strolled into a conference room at the Sanford School of Public Policy wearing blue jeans, a navy blazer and a T-shirt with a peace sign. The nearest thing to Secret Service was campus police. Read the full story here.

More political headlines:

--Fracking opponents keep up efforts to block drilling in North Carolina.

Cars View All
Find a Car
Go
Jobs View All
Find a Job
Go
Homes View All
Find a Home
Go

Want to post a comment?

In order to join the conversation, you must be a member of dome.newsobserver.com. Click here to register or to log in.
Advertisements