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Finding green on 'scorched earth'?

Beverly Perdue hopes to raise some green off of "scorched earth."

The lieutenant governor's campaign for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination has sent out an e-mail trying to raise money to fight state Treasurer Richard Moore's recent attacks on her record.

In recent weeks, Moore's campaign has gone on the offense over Perdue's resume, an endorsement from the N.C. Association of Educators and transportation funding. (He's also gone after her pro-choice credentials, though the e-mail doesn't mention it.)

In the e-mail, Campaign Manager Zach Ambrose says he's out of line:

It's sad that Richard Moore thinks that this is the only way he can win. We will not sit back and let him get away with it. More importantly, North Carolina's Democrats won't let that kind of smear campaign work in a Democratic primary.

He also asks for $50, $250 or $500 contributions.


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How about a little policy substance?

Dear Richard Moore's Campaign Manager:

It's hard to understand why you're complaining to the Dome on this issue. Ryan Beckwith has happily posted virtually every attack you've sent him over the past few months - maybe he just needs a rest from carrying water for your campaign.

More important, some of us outside the beltline take strong issue with your statement:

The candidates are yapping at each other, dragging up history and votes from years long ago. That’s OK; that is what campaigns are all about.

Maybe yapping is what campaigns are all about where you come from, but it is not "OK" with the people I talk to every day. And we don't really care who started it. That fact is, you're knee-deep in intra-party mud-slinging, and many of us are sick of it.

And finally, I totally agree with this comment:

Candidates who want to move that $170 million to the Highway Trust Fund had better be able to demonstrate how they are going to compensate for the loss to the General Fund.

Your candidate says things should be carefully handled? Let's hear how.

How about a little Perdue fact checking?

Bev Perdue looked a camera in the eye and said she would end the transfer that she sponsored and voted for. Richard Moore is firmly on the record that he would not make such a change without finding new revenue. He won’t make across the board cuts to education, health care, and law enforcement, to end the transfer, which is what Perdue has suggested. As the Winston-Salem Journal wrote:

“Republicans Bill Graham, Sen. Fred Smith and former N.C. Supreme Court Justice Bob Orr say that the transfer should end. So does Democratic Lt. Gov. Bev Perdue, who, as a legislator in 1989, was a co-sponsor of the bipartisan highway-improvement act that included the transfer….

But Moore is right when he says that this change cannot be made until offsetting revenues are found for the General Fund. Failure to do so would rob $170 million from education and other human-service programs. The candidates are yapping at each other, dragging up history and votes from years long ago. That’s OK; that is what campaigns are all about. North Carolina voters, however, must stay focused on the essential element of this debate: Transportation needs more money but not at the expense of the General Fund.

Any candidate who says that there is a magic pot of $170 million for road improvements without harming education is simply wrong. Candidates who want to move that $170 million to the Highway Trust Fund had better be able to demonstrate how they are going to compensate for the loss to the General Fund. Robbing schools to pay for roads won’t work.”

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